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Heather
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13/9/2005
06:55:16
Subject: John Juzek violin
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I have a violin with a label on the inside that says:

John Juzek
Violinmaker in Prague
signed: John Juzek
Made in Czechoslovakia

On the other side of the violin (on the inside) is another very old tag that says:

3-4-4
Property of Irving Lilly

The violin is about 22 1/4 inches long. If anyone knows anything about this violin such as it's Value, age, and so on, I would love to hear about it.


Gordon Burns
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13/9/2005
11:20:01
RE: John Juzek violin
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Hi Heather,

Nice one! Jan Juzek's violins are really quite nice, I have found. Yours sounds like it's a 3/4 size (length of back will be less than 14").

Juzek's instruments date from well before 1920 to around 1935, as far as my research goes so far. Since yours states 'Made in Czechoslovakia' it will be post-1920 or thereabouts.

He built on the Guarneri model, but with elongated f-holes, and added an exquisitely carved almost spot-on Stradiuarian style scroll.

You have a nice instrument, Heather... love it and play it.

Regards,
Gordon


Graham Welsh Host
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13/9/2005
21:12:52
RE: John Juzek violin
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Funny thing is I've always wanted to have one by this maker. They seem to be quite consistent in manufacturing terms.
Graham


Frank W
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14/9/2005
06:21:58
RE: John Juzek violin
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Hi!
My Juzek viola has the "formerly in Prague" label.
Just wondering how much downhill did Juzek's instruments go after the war when they started being made in Germany?
Juzek was known for his high standards, so one would think he might have tried to keep up his standards at least initially.
I'm guessing mine is from the 40's or 50's based on the wear and tear.
I have the top off for some crack repairs and the corner blocks don't go all the way to the points, obvious short cuts, but the wood appears to be nice all around. Nice figure, tight spruce etc.
Was there another label change which might help to get a time frame of manufacure?
I've read somewhere that they were still better than most factory violins at the time.
Are they still being made in Germany or are they now Chinese?
Thanks
Frank







Gordon Burns
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14/9/2005
10:02:31
RE: John Juzek violin
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Hi Frank,

As far as my research goes, Jan Juzek made only in Prague, and the 'name' was sold after his death. I have never come across a Juzek that wasn't properly made, and the faux corner blocks are definitely not a feature of this maker's work. If your ticket states 'formerly of Prague' then you will have an instrument made by the company that bought his name, and not by the man himself, and hence nothing at all to do with Jan Juzek. Your violin was made using a factory-style external mould, which allows construction without blocks. Before the garland is taken out of the mould, these thin lumps of wood were placed across the corners to give a little strength (enough to enable safe removal) and to look like it is fully blocked (yet another German deceit). It is not until someone removes the top that the truth about the blocks becomes clear.

I think your estimate of time will be about right, probably post-war to 1950's.

Regards,
Gordon


Heather
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14/9/2005
10:24:24
RE: John Juzek violin
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Are John Juzek violins, with the label that reads "Violinmaker in Prauge" rare? Or are there alot around?


Gordon Burns
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14/9/2005
10:30:31
RE: John Juzek violin
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not too rare, as he was quite a prolific maker.

Regards,
Gordon


Frank W
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15/9/2005
05:11:39
RE: John Juzek violin
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Hi Gordon
Thanks a lot.
I got it real cheap as a fixer upper to learn viola stuff on, but will keep a lookout for a proper Juzek. A "Master Art" would be real nice.

I also have a Franz Diener Graslitz 18-- violin that I am currently using I hope you can help me with. I posted some info under my H.A. Littlehale post, but will post again in a separate post. I haven't seen anything here about Franz Dieners. The appraisal from the 70's that it came with claimed the sticker to be from the 1840s. It is definetly old and plays great. The peg holes have been rebushed so I'm sure it has been played a lot.

Thanks again
Frank







Gordon Burns
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15/9/2005
10:52:36
RE: John Juzek violin
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Hi Frank,

Franz Deiner (1790-1866) was son and pupil of Joseph (1st) Deiner, and worked in Graslitz (in Czech - Krazlice) and in Carlsbad. He mostly made cheap trade instruments, of a slightly under-sized (less than 14" back) of average workmanship and no individuality. However, the tonal quality is these days is quite good, being devoid of much of the 'nasal' stuff found in German equivalents. His violas are probably better than his violins.

He has been copied (or faked), as most makers prior to 1850 have. Tickets should run...

++++++++++++++++++++
Franz Deiner
fecit Graslitz Anno 18xx
++++++++++++++++++++

OR

++++++++++++++++++++
Franz Deiner fecit Graslitz
18xx
++++++++++++++++++++

The type 2 ticket dates from around 1850 onwards, so I am guessing your ticket matches Type 1. If it doesn't match either, then it may well be a copy or fake.

I hope this helps.

Kindest regards,
Gordon




Frank W
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15/9/2005
20:32:11
RE: John Juzek violin
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Hi Gordon
My violin matches your type 1 sticker perfectly.
Interestingly though, the body length is 360mm or slightly over 14 3/16". Not sure what all that means except maybe old Franz was having a good violin day, or maybe he grabbed the kiddie viola mold by mistake.
Even more interesting is why would this appraisal give the violin at the time (the 70's) a value of $200.00. Thats what the guy sold it to me for based on the appraisal. Maybe regional appraisals vary greatly. Mine was done somewhere in Arkansaw,USA. I'm just a hick from Alaska, but based on sound alone, even I could tell there was something more to this old violin.
I might splurge someday for a second opinion, but meanwhile I might have to think I did allright.
I did see a Franz Diener cello listed in an online music store sell for $6000 sometime ago.
I'm glad the Arkansaw guys didn't see that, but fortunately, "Google" was still about 25 years in the future.
Thanks a lot, Gordon.
Frank






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